BLOG

Turning seaweed – sea vegetables – into a mainstay of American menus

...."We are hoping seaweed is going to be the next kale,”referring to the once-doughty winter vegetable which has become trendily omnipresent in recent years.

Charlie Yarish, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and marine sciences at University of Connecticut (UConn) is using the expertise that’s made him a globally renowned seaweed specialist to help birth an entirely new industry up and down the East Coast of the USA. He envisions a day when seaweed farms, using techniques developed at the University of Connecticut, will stretch from one end of Long Island Sound to the other.

This is happening at a time when more and more Americans are thinking hard about what goes onto their plate, from whether it’s healthy, to how it was produced. Seaweed pushes all those local food, organic, health-conscious, and foodie buttons. “I call them sea vegetables rather than seaweed,” Yarish says, “Because that’s a more accurate description. Just like vegetables, they’re high in nutrients, vitamins, and trace elements, and they’re good for you, and they’re delicious…. We are hoping seaweed is going to be the next kale,” referring to the once-doughty winter vegetable which has become trendily omnipresent in recent years.” See the video Seaweed, the virtuous vegetable.

The key seems to be about getting the word out that seaweed isn’t just for sushi, although that’s probably how most people have encountered it as food. In trendy Manhattan restaurants like Louro, seaweed-featuring dishes have ranged from kelp pasta with crab to pork belly with kelp salad to scallops and rice tossed in kelp vinegar.

Read  From lab to the dinner table

Currency converter

Facebook